A forest dies on Mauna Kea; how feral sheep are destroying an Hawaiian woodland

Author: Warner, Richard E.
Title: A forest dies on Mauna Kea; how feral sheep are destroying an Hawaiian woodland
Periodical: Pacific Discovery
Year: 1960
Volume: 13
Pages: 6-14
Subject: Feral sheep
Mamane
Sophora Chrysophylla
Koa
Mamane-naio forest
Restoration ecology
Summary: This document tells of how feral livestock was brought to the islands by Captain Cook and Captain Vancouver at around 1800, how a tabu that was placed on the animals allowed the livestock population to multiply extremely fast, and how the overgrazing of feral cattle, sheep, goats, and horses lead to the destruction of the forests that consisted of Mamane (Sophora chrysophylla), Koa, and Naio (Myoporum sandwicense) trees along with the understory of shrubs and grasses. Also described, are the efforts that were made in an attempt to restore these forests through the establishment of a Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, fencing projects, and other government efforts that were designed to protect the forests from further abuse.
Label: Ecology
Date: 1960
Database: Periodicals

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