Hawaiian honeycreeper home range size varies with habitat: implications for native acacia koa forestry

Author: Pejchar, Liba
Holl, Karen D.
Lockwood, Julie L.
Title: Hawaiian honeycreeper home range size varies with habitat: implications for native acacia koa forestry
Periodical: Ecological Applications
Year: 2005
Volume: 15
Pages: 1053-1061
Subject: Acacia koa
Akiapolaau
Foraging behavior
Forests and forestry
Habitat conservation
Hemignathus munroi
Home range
Hawaiian honeycreepers
Old-growth forest conservation
Territoriality (zoology)
Reforestation
Summary: For economic and ecological benefit, one of greatest challenges of conservation biology is the restoring of large areas of degraded land. While plantation forestry is not a substitute for protected areas, establishing timber plantations by using native species is a promising way to reforest landscapes while maintaining economic use of the land. It is also a good compromise between creating habitat while restoring the productive capacity of the landscape. However, due to their uniformity and the fact that timber plantations are likely to be harvested, they are often regarded as poor habitat for native fauna. Still, few studies have investigated whether plantation land can support wildlife. As a result, this study investigates a young Acacia koa plantation and two old-growth forest sites on the island of Hawaii with regard to the habitat use and territoriality of the Akiapolaau (Hemignathus munroi) -- an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper and the rarest forest bird in Hawaii.
Label: Birds - Akiapolaau
URL: http://cletus.uhh.hawaii.edu:2074/10.1890/04-0577
Database: Periodicals

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